Many of you will have already seen the paper Russian dolls hanging on various noticeboards and shop windows, loitering with no intent and boasting the words “What’s Inside?”. Well, that is the question: what is inside Russia Week 2012? 

The Russian Society has been working tirelessly to bring together this vast event. There is enigma, controversy and misunderstanding surrounding anything that even mentions Russia. Don’t argue; we all know what goes through your heads when someone so much as dares to mention Putin. Russia Week 2012 is not about presidential elections, foreign policy or dogmatic ideologies.  Russia is a country which has so much more to it, than the depictions you see in Western newspapers. It is a country of Pushkin, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, elite sportsmen, wonderful cuisine, prominent philosophers, Tchaikovsky, ballet, opera, heart-warming cinema, architecture, military heroes, small chocolates worth trading your soul for, and a rich history spanning almost 1200 years. 

There will be ample events to enjoy, which I guarantee will appeal to every student in St Andrews. Among other things, the Russian Society has prepared the following:

  • Lectures by leading professors in the field, such as Andrew Graham Dixon, Bridgett Kendall, and Angus Roxburgh.

  • Dreamworks’ Anastasia screening in the cinema. 

  • Food tasting allowing you to sample the most exquisite dishes Russia has to offer. 

  • An enormous Vodka Party which guarantees a repeat of Raisin Weekend. 

  • And for those who simply must raise the topic of politics, there will be a series of debates with journalists who interviewed Vladimir Putin. 

For more information visit the Facebook page

  • LSmith

    This article is truly offensive and completely ignorant. Do you really think that everyone who goes to private schools are from wealthy backgrounds? I went to a private school on a bursary and a scholarship, while my sister went on my parents’ entire life savings. We never had a holiday or nice things, because they chose to invest the money they made – as a primary school teacher and a minister – on our education. There’s nothing wrong with that and we still had to work our backsides off (yes, doing internships) to get to university. In this day and age, a school labelling itself as state or private merely tells the reader how it’s funded. It says nothing about the kinds of students it admits.

  • The Voice of Reason?

    It’s not difficult to argue that private schools are bad for society (and I went to one). They’re against social mobility, they enforce social segregation and they create a two tier system that preferences intelligent rich people over intelligent poor people. This article fails to make any of those points clearly, instead going for the let’s mock a posh stereotype option

    • Someone who read the original

      It’s replying to the (even more poorly structured) private school article from last month, and is therefore based on the points raised there. Perhaps ironically, this article is far better written than the original.